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Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween!

Happy Halloween! To round off our collection of monsters this month, here is our last system-agnostic monster to plug into your games. This time we have the Memory Eater, created by Ariana and Liz, and illustrated by Sarah Richardson.


Memory Eater

Their features blur whenever you see them. Were their eyes blue or gray? Brown or green? Were they bald or not? A lithe body that  makes it difficult to determine their gender. If you see them, you immediately forget specifics and  would describe them as ‘common’ or ‘average’ looking.

Memory Eaters are said to be fairy folk, while others have said they’re demons or spell binders who have  gotten lost in the addiction of their consumption. They do as their name says, they eat memories. They like consuming the ones of your past, of a face you loved well but  then forget like a fading memory. They take the form of your loved one, they blend in.

As a child you remember your grandfather’s funeral, you remember the staleness of the room, the stillness, the sobbing your mother made. It was a shattering quiet scream, how her mouth opened but no sound came out, just tears and panting breaths. As you grow older it fades, the black attire turns blue,  the smell crumbles into dust, and it’s gone. Your mother asks if you want to visit your grandfather, but instead of a cemetery you go to a nursing home and he’s there. Wrinkled, old, and hunched over with age. You don’t remember ever leaving him here, you don’t recall him ever selling his house, but there he is, gumming at his jello and yelling at the TV he can’t hear anymore.

Why do our loved ones from the memories end up in nursing homes? Because that’s where we leave our forgotten.

Oh, people say they visit their loved ones’ grave but that’s a lie. That moment when you swear you’ll see them again? It would happen, but you just forgot they were gone. The memories are consumed, filling the Memory Eater’s belly with  a glutton’s feast of rich emotions. The more tragic, the better the meal.

If you want them to erase someone entirely? Oh, that’ll take a pretty penny. To forget… is so consuming.


Moves

Bend with the weak (defensive) (+1)

On a 6 and under: The memory eater fails to defend himself.

On a 7-9: Painful memories flood into the mind of the memory eater’s victim at a cost to the memory eater, they take -1 forward for having lost a tasty memory morsel.

On a 10+: The memory eater’s features blur into that of someone else in the room and your head pounds with painful memories you could have sworn you’d forgotten. The creature darts from side to side, an attack that was meant for them is landed on an ally in the confusion.


Do what’s natural (attack/passive MO) (+1)

On a 6 and under: The memory eater is spotted! They are unable to hide themselves by stealing current memories and may be acted against.

On a 7-9: The memory eater steals a current thought from their victim. It is sweet and allows them to sustain themselves that little bit longer.

On a 10+: The memory eater steals an old memory, a memory that has been cherished and remembered, a fleeting moment that they can revel in forever.


Ariana Ramos is a curly-headed award-winning sass monster who wears glasses. She identifies as a Latina Feminist, owns two pit bulls, married to a public school teacher, and tries to be a good person. You can follow her on Twitter as @vesseltosea.

Liz Chaipraditkul is a writer and game developer. She is the owner of Angry Hamster Publishing, a company that develops and publishes tabletop role playing games. She dabbles in illustration and other crafts, but her true love is writing. You can read more of her personal ramblings on her blog epicxcloth.blogspot.com, or follow her on Twitter as @epicxcloth.

Sarah 'Doombringer' Richardson is a graphic artist who illustrates, lays out, and creates tabletop RPGs. She writes for Women Write About Comics and you can hear her on the IGDN podcast, Indie Syndicate. You can see her work at www.scorcha.net and follow her on Twitter as@scorcha79.

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